Oncoscience

Docetaxel increases the risk of severe infections in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer: a meta-analysis

Qingcheng Du1,*, Guanming Jiang2,*, Silu Li3, Yong Liu1,4, Zunnan Huang1,5

1 School of Pharmacy, Guangdong Medical University, Dongguan, Guangdong 523808, China

2 Department of Medical Oncology, Dongguan People’s Hospital, Dongguan, Guangdong 523018, China

4 Key Laboratory for Research and Development of Natural Drugs of Guangdong Province, Zhanjiang, Guangdong 524023, China

3 School of Basic Medicine, Guangdong Medical University, Dongguan, Guangdong 523808, China

4 Key Laboratory for Medical Molecular Diagnostics of Guangdong Province, Dongguan Scientific Research Center, Guangdong Medical University, Guangdong 523808, China

* These authors contributed equally to this work.

Correspondence to:

Yong Liu, email:liuyong0614@126.com
Zunnan Huang, email:zn_huang@yahoo.com

Keywords: docetaxel; infections; non-small cell lung cancer; mechanism; systematic review

Received: November 11, 2017 Accepted: May 15, 2018 Published: August 22, 2018

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine whether docetaxel increases the risk of severe infections in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. A thorough literature search of the PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases was performed (up to February 28, 2017) without any language restrictions. In addition, we searched the www.clinicaltrials.gov website and checked each reference listed in the included studies, relevant reviews and guidelines. We also included randomized controlled trials that reported severe infections in patients with non-small cell lung cancer who were administered docetaxel. A meta-analysis was conducted using relative risk and random effects models in Stata 14.0 software. Sensitivity analysis and meta-regression were performed using Stata 14.0 software. We identified 354 records from the initial search, and this systematic review ultimately included 43 trials with 12,447 participants. The results of our meta-analysis showed that docetaxel increased the risk of severe infections [relative risk: 2.10, 95% confidence interval: 1.51-2.93, I2 = 69.6%, P = 0.000]. Meta-regression analysis indicated that the type of intervention was a major source of heterogeneity. Our systematic review and meta-analysis suggest that docetaxel is associated with the risk of severe infections.


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